Divisions
Allergy, Immunology and Pulmonary Medicine
Division Faculty
Research
Paul E. Moore, M.D.
Eric D. Austin, M.D., M.S.C.I.
Lisa R. Young Lab
Pediatric Pulmonology Fellowship
Patient Care
Contact Us

Our faculty members are nationally recognized for their collaborative efforts to understand the basic science of childhood disorders and translating discoveries into better ways to deliver care and improve the health of children.

Paul E. Moore, M.D.
Dr. Moore's research focuses on asthma. His work with Dr. Judy Aschner in the NIH-funded Premature and Respiratory Outcomes Program (PROP) has focused on the molecular mechanisms that contribute to respiratory disease risk of the premature newborn. Dr. Moore also collaborates with Dr. Tina Hartert in the INSPIRE Cohort, a collection of 2000 infants born in Middle Tennessee that we have characterized and follow to better understand the early exposures that contribute to the development of asthma. Other research interests include determining how genetic and environmental factors will impact the management of children with asthma. Learn more about Dr. Moore's research

Eric D. Austin, M.D., MSCI
Eric Austin is a physician-scientist specializing in translational research studies. The Austin Research Group is a combined laboratory-based and patient-oriented translational research program that focuses on pulmonary hypertension and other cardiopulmonary morbidities in children and adults with and without preexisting known genetic risks, including BMPR2 gene mutations. Learn more about Dr. Austin's research

Lisa R. Young, M.D.
Dr. Young's primary research interest is in interstitial lung diseases (ILD). Active research projects in her lab utilize genetic mouse models of ILD to understand the roles of the alveolar epithelium and alveolar macrophages in the regulation of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. Dr. Young also performs clinical and translational research in childhood ILD and Lymphangioleiomyomatosis. Current studies are focused on genetic discovery in Neuroendocrine cell Hyperplasia of Infancy (NEHI) and other forms of childhood ILD. Learn more about Dr. Young's research

 



 
Vanderbilt University School Of Medicine
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Monroe Carrell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt